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OSHA OFFERS RELIEF FROM GHS COMPLIANCE DEADLINE

Posted By ASC, Friday, November 7, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, May 12, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Media Contact:

Mark Collatz

Director of Regulatory Affairs

(301) 986-9700 x112

mark.collatz@ascouncil.org



November 7, 2014 – Bethesda, MD –
 In response to an Adhesive and Sealant Council's (ASC) petition, the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Association (OSHA) has agreed to provide adhesive and sealant manufacturers, as well as other formulated product manufacturers, enforcement relief from the June 1, 2015 compliance deadline for implementation of the Global Harmonization Standard (GHS).  The petition was coordinated with eight other trade associations representing various segments of the chemical formulating community.

The administrative relief will come in the form of a compliance directive and enforcement policy that will allow regulated formulators, who can demonstrate due diligence and a good faith effort to obtain information for compliance with June 2015 deadline, to avoid being subject to violation penalties.

Formulators, who do not expect be in full compliance under next year’s continuing deadline, should take steps to document their efforts to obtain the information from suppliers they need to create new safety data sheets (SDSs) and the revised GHS labels as well as record any attempts made to find the information on their own.

 

“OSHA’s agreement to use some common sense in their enforcement policy will definitely offer relief to our members who are struggling to gather a lot of information from many different sources and then organize it into the new SDS format and develop GHS labels,” said Mark Collatz, ASC’s Director of Regulatory Affairs.  

 

Collatz noted that ASC and all the petitioning groups will be working very closely with OSHA staff during the rest of the year to establish what will be considered a “good faith” effort by their enforcement personnel.

“Eventually, as a result of these meetings over the next few months, we expect that the Agency will issue a formal policy compliance directive that will provide clarity and guidance to both those doing the enforcing and those trying to comply,” said Collatz. 
 

The ASC and the eight petitioning trade associations originally requested relief form OSHA in August citing the fact that both raw material manufacturers and formulators were operating under a simultaneous deadline that created an unworkable situation for their members.   

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The Adhesive and Sealant Council (ASC) is a North American trade association dedicated to representing the $40 billion global adhesive and sealant industry.  The Council is comprised of 131 adhesive and sealant manufacturers, raw material and equipment suppliers, representing 75% of the U.S. industry.  “Innovators secure the future with adhesives and sealants” is the vision of ASC, and the Council produces programs that support five strategic objectives covering Career Education, Community Knowledge Integration, Innovation, Unified Industry Voice and Accelerate Growth.  Information on ASC can be found at www.ascouncil.org.  Industry solutions and news can be found at www.adhesives.org or www.sealants.org.  

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EPA UPDATES TSCA CHEMICAL WORK PLAN LIST FOR CHEMICAL ASSESSMENTS

Posted By ASC, Thursday, October 30, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, May 12, 2015

What’s at Issue: 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has updated the list of existing chemicals for assessment under its Toxic Substances Work Plan for Chemical Assessment. According to the agency, the changes reflect updated data submitted to EPA on chemical releases and potential exposures. This represents the first update to the Work Plan list since it was created in February 2012.

What’s New: The changes include the addition of 23 chemicals that will be considered for assessment after 2017.  They are:

  • 1,3-Butadiene - Consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • 2,5-Furandione - Consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • 2-Dimethylaminoethanol - Consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • 2-Hydroxy-4-(octyloxy)benzophenone - Commercial and consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • 3,3’-Dichloro-benzidine - Reported releases to TRI increased, leading to a higher exposure score
  • 4,4'-(1-Methylethylidene)bis[2,6-dibromophenol] (TBBPA) - Reported releases to TRI increased, leading to a higher exposure score
  • Barium carbonate - Commercial and consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • Dicyclohexyl phthalate - Production volume increased and types of consumer uses have changed, leading to a higher exposure score
  • isopropylated phenol, phosphate (iPTPP) - Hazard, exposure, and persistence/bioaccumulation rankings are high
  • Molybdenum and Molybdenum Compounds – Increased production volume and consumer and industrial uses, leading to a higher exposure score
  • Pentachlorothiophenol - Increased production volume and industrial uses, leading to a higher exposure score
  • Triphenyl phosphate (TPP) - Hazard exposure rankings are high
  • Bisphenol A (BPA) - Hazard and exposure rankings are high
  • Decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) - Hazard, exposure, and persistence/bioaccumulation rankings are high
  • Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) - Hazard, exposure, and persistence/bioaccumulation rankings are high
  • Nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP/NPE) - Hazard and exposure rankings are high
  • Group of phthalates (dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP), di-isononyl phthalate (DINP), di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), and di-isobutyl phthalate (DIBP) - Hazard and exposure rankings are high

The update also removes 16 chemicals, most of which are no longer in commerce in the U.S. A potential review of mercury was discontinued because the agency believes the hazards are already well-characterized and risk reduction efforts are in place while quartz was dropped because potential exposures are regulated by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The others include:

  • 1,2,4,5-Tetrachloro-benzene
  • 4-Chloro-2-methylaniline (p-Chloro-o-toluidine)
  • Benz(a)anthracene
  • Dibenz(a,h)anthracene
  • Dibromochloromethane
  • Dichloroacetic acid
  • Hexabromobiphenyl
  • Hexachlorocyclohexane
  • N-Nitroso-ethylamine
  • N-Nitrosodimethylamine
  • Pentabromophenol
  • Polychlorinated naphthalenes
  • Tris(2,3-di bromopropyl) phosphate (TBP)

Click here for a copy of the updated Work Plan with a description of all 90 listed chemicals. 

Why it’s Important: The TSCA Work Plan for Chemical Assessments best reflects the chemicals for which EPA presently has the most concern.  Unless there are further revisions, it should be assumed that the Agency will concentrate hazard assessments, and if warranted, risk reduction actions, on these compounds for the remainder of the decade.

Adhesive and sealant manufacturers should review the recently added chemicals and alert ASC regarding whether any of the recently added chemicals are utilized significantly in their formulations.  

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DOW CORNING LAUNCHES NEW ITEMS AT GLASSTEC 2014

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Dow Corning® 3363 Insulating Glass Sealant and Dow Corning® Transparent Structural Silicone Adhesive (TSSA) were recently debuted at Glasstec 2014. Both are highly engineered silicone products from a company known in part for its expertise in silicone adhesives and sealants. 3363 Insulating Glass Sealant and TSSA will help architects and manufacturers conserve energy and increase durability, while also allowing greater design freedom. Dow Corning 3363 Insulating Glass Sealant is fast curing with up to a 50% increase in bond strength over comparable products. This sealant allows 30% smaller joints for faster curing on gas-filled double- and triple-glazed panels capable of withstanding hurricane-level wind. Dow Corning TSSA provides a completely clear finish for sleek facades that offer energy savings. Markus Plettau—regional market leader, Europe High Performance Building Solutions at Dow Corning—commented: “For over twenty five years, Dow Corning has collaborated with building industry leaders to engineer some of the most advanced materials technologies in the world to enable buildings that not only sustain energy, but even reduce energy consumption, without compromising aesthetics or functionality.”

FULL STORY

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Q&A: INSIDE THE RSI LAB

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

At RS Industrual (RSI), Technical Service Chemist Gabby Leeds recently offered insight into the company lab and the many services it provides. RSI is an international distributor providing exceptional adhesives, coatings, and tapes as well as a support team that ensures customer’s needs are met. The RSI lab provides quality analysis, product recommendations and R&D for clients. The lab can test a customer’s substrate with a variety of adhesives. Commonly, this includes testing tensile strength and performance in hot or cold conditions. The lab takes on challenging projects, for example modifying a water-based adhesive for landscaping with very harsh outdoor conditions. The RSI lab will work with customers to provide excellent service, problem solving and savings on cost and materials. RSI looks at total unit cost per thousand, including costs related to downtime, production speeds, spoilage rates and consumption. This approach provides customers with high-performance materials and true savings.

FULL STORY

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CHEAPER PRINTED SOLAR CELLS WITH ADHESIVE, CONDUCTIVE LAMINATE

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Traditionally solar cells require gold electrodes and have opaque backing. Neither is ideal; gold is relatively expensive and opaque materials limit light penetration. Now, the latest generation of solar cells could make use of a nickel grid with a new transparent conductive adhesive. To make the cell, the nickel grid is printed onto a transparent PET (polyethylene-terephthalate) sheet that has been coated with the conductive adhesive. The adhesive was specially formulated for this application. It had to provide a mechanical bond that would allow the cell to function, but also remain crystal clear. Ultimately, an acrylic microemulsion inspired by household tapes was developed. With this adhesive, the nickel grid printed on the PET laminate behaves much like any adhesive tape and can be applied with light pressure for final assembly at room temperature. One of the developers, Daniel Bryant commented, “The critical advantage of the new room-temperature lamination method is that it is well-suited to mass production, using well established processes.”  A group at Swansea University, Wales (UK), that developed the solar cells and the novel adhesive system and is now working to scale up production.

FULL STORY

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BAYER MATERIALSCIENCE LLC HELPS BUILDING PROFESSIONALS MEET THEIR SUSTAINABILITY GOALS

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

As construction incorporates more sustainable products and practices, Bayer MaterialScience LLC is prepared with high-performance, environmentally friendly coatings, adhesives and sealant technologies. Bayer offers low-VOC compounds and energy saving formulations, including polycarbonates, polyurethanes, coatings and adhesives and sealants raw materials. Notably their adhesive, sealant, and coating technologies are durable with exceptional performance. Polyaspartic coatings from Bayer combine this durability with the ability to perform under a range of conditions. Polyaspartic coatings can cure under a wide range of temperatures and humidity. Bayer’s polyurethane products include both insulations foams and raw materials. Polyurethane products are idea for challenging applications and can withstand heat from flame or outside conditions.

FULL STORY

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MALLARD CREEK POLYMERS REMINDS INDUSTRY OF THE FULL LINE OF STYRENE-BUTADIENE POLYMER EMULSIONS

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Mallard Creek Polymers, Inc.

 (MCP) offers the Rovene®, Tylac® and BarrierPro® lines of styrene-butadiene polymer emulsions. Styrene-butadiene (SB) polymer emulsions may be used in adhesives, caulks, sealants, barrier coatings and many other applications. This type of emulsion offers versatile performance with superior resistance to water, alkali conditions and chemical exposure. The stability of SB emulsions makes them an excellent option where high fiber acceptance and pigmentation are required. They can be formulated for elastomeric waterproofing membranes and coatings. This means the emulsions are an excellent base for flooring adhesives compatible with ceramic tile, carpet, wood, or vinyl. In addition to SB emulsions, MCP offers a full line of acrylic and styrene acrylic polymer emulsions.

FULL STORY

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GECKO LOCOMOTION: WHAT GOES UP MUST COME DOWN

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

As researchers look at options for biomimetic adhesives, the gecko is a creature that continues to excite and offer up new insights. Geckos are adapted to stick to slick and wet surfaces, even at extremely steep angles. However, the minuscule hair-like projections that allow a gecko to stick also have a structure that suggests the adhesion only works on forces in one direction.  Typically, this helps geckos climb upwards, but going downhill, they must rotate their hind leg, potentially more than 70 degrees to take advantage of the single-direction adhesion. Quantifying the angles geckos use to stick may seem like an unlikely research project. However, gecko-inspired adhesion is being developed as an attachment method for robots both on Earth and during space missions.  In the future, research on how this adhesion method functions may be used to build better robots capable of navigating complex and steep terrain.

FULL STORY

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ESA RESEARCH FINDS NEW ADHESIVE TO DEVELOP ULTRA-STABLE STRUCTURES FOR SPACE INSTRUMENTS

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

European Space Agency (ESA)

 scientists have developed an ultra-stable adhesive for use in space missions and research equipment. The adhesive is silicone based and resistant to moisture and temperature. It allows construction of larger stable structures that are stable to within a few thousandths of a millimeter. To develop an ultra-stable adhesive, the ESA looked at products on the market and adapted ultimately an existing adhesive by adding ceramic fillers and customizing performance characteristics. The ESA commented on the potential of this adhesive: “Such stability will be essential for new classes of space mission, such as multi-satellite telescopes spaced hundreds of kilometers apart, which could combine their light to create images at a resolution equivalent to a single giant telescope, providing they maintain precise alignment.”

FULL STORY

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PROTECT YOUR WOOD FROM NASTY GLUE OVERFLOW WITH TAPE

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Updated: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Sometimes the solution to too much adhesive is … more adhesive? In woodworking, a common issue is excess glue squeezing out of joints. This has the potential to stain wood or cause unsightly glue beads on finished objects. One option to prevent this or make clean up easier is using adhesive tape. Simply clamp the pieces together without glue and put pieces of adhesive tape covering the length of the seam. Then, cut down the length of the tape along the seam, leaving each piece with a protective border of tape on the face of the joint. When the pieces are joined with glue, any excess will bead onto the tape and can be easily removed.

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