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Acrylic Adhesives the Key to Physiotherapists’ Secret Weapon: Kinesio Tape

Posted By ASC, 17 hours ago
Updated: Tuesday, July 7, 2020

From Olympic team members to volleyball players and swimmers, athletes have been strapping themselves with acrylic adhesive backed tapes in colorful patterns for some time now. Generally the tools of physiotherapists, these tapes are used to relieve pain, assist in recovery from injury, and as a preventative measure against muscle or tendon flare-ups which could threaten the performance on the field, the court, or in the water.


The cotton fiber kinesio tape is backed by a medical-grade acrylic adhesive which has elasticity similar to that of the skin. This allows for reasonably free movement which does not affect the bond, or the carefully selected placement of the tapes which is done in such a way that they can assist muscular function without immobilizing joints.


The adhesive is also water resistant, hypoallergenic and latex free to ensure that it can be comfortably left in place for as long as three to five days, without causing skin reactions, or losing its adherence.

 

 

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Masking Tape Goes Green for High Performance and High Heat

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, July 7, 2020

With particular focus on industrial, automotive, and speciality vehicle assembly sectors, 3M has shined the green light on masking tape precision and adherence in paint bake operations where surfaces reach temperatures as high as 250°F (121°C) for as long as 30 minutes. To meet the requirements the company has added a new high performance masking tape to their range, and have colored it green.


According to the company, green was chosen for the crepe paper backing over the tan or off-white colors traditionally associated with masking tape, in order to make the tape more visible and therefore increase the accuracy of the paint lines when masking. To further support accuracy levels, the tape is also designed to resist bleed-through.


The company reports that the proprietary solvent-free adhesive used on the masking tape allows for rapid adherence to a wide range of substrates including plastic, metal, rubber moldings and glass, while at the same time the crepe paper backing ensures conformity with irregular or curved surfaces and keeps the tape in place around corners. On completion of the painting, the tape can be removed in one piece without leaving residue.


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Adhesives.org BLOG: Science vs. the Humanities: Curiosity, Passion, and Skepticism Meet

Posted By ASC, Monday, July 6, 2020

BLOG:  Science vs. the Humanities: Curiosity, Passion, and Skepticism Meet
 
By Ujjval Vyas

I have had recent conversations with scientists who all seemed resigned to the irreconcilability of the sciences and the humanities. In a way, recent events are representative of this theme of separateness. It has been my view for a long time that these two engines of human interaction with the world are not irreconcilable, and are, at the heart of things, the same. I normally refrain from taking a first-person view when posting to this blog, but I think this might be a useful exception.

I was not immune to this false dichotomy—that those in science and the humanities think in a fundamentally different manner and the twain shall never meet—for a large portion of my life. Over many years, and having engaged in the humanities and in scientific pursuits in various ways, I am now firmly convinced that the two worlds are like our eyesight. We have two eyes but what we perceive is a unitary thing. If we purposely close one eye or the other, we are aware that there is a left eye and a right eye, but no one thinks we interpret the world better by blinding one eye.

The historian is as plagued by the difficulty of pursuing an “objective” point of view as the physicist. When Kurt Gödel, to his own chagrin, came to realize that all axiomatic systems, including mathematics, were permanently incomplete or the Pythagoreans discovered that the square root of two was irrational, it was disturbing, but no less so than the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls or the rediscovery of Greek and Hebrew in the early Italian Renaissance were to historians at that time.

Both science and the humanities are about human interpretation of the world, not the world as it really is in an absolute sense. And because the human interpreter is the common element, although science and the humanities may have differing substance of examination, the flaws and limitations of interpretation are also common to both. But there are three human attributes that can help to mitigate these limitations: curiosity, passion, and skepticism. Consistently applied, they form a stable, three-legged stool, a common framework for seeking understanding.

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Ensuring Optimal UV Curing: Controlling the Variables

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, June 30, 2020

There are variables that have to be taken into account when curing. These include the quantity of adhesive being used and its location; the length of time the adhesive will be exposed to the UV light, and level of light intensity; and the distance between the source and the bondline. These process variables should be fixed to ensure consistency of process repeatably in the future.


The distance between the lamp and the adhesive: Light intensity drops considerably as the distance increases. According to the formula outlining the rate of fall, if the distance is doubled, only one quarter of the energy will remain. Shortening the distance as much as possible will result in the fastest cure, improve performance and shorten the process period.


Using lower power UV light for a longer time period to try and make up for the loss of intensity could result in less optimal or incomplete curing, especially when using adhesives that have minimum levels for energy activation.


The length of exposure to UV light is what both kick starts, and stops, the curing process of most adhesives. As soon as the adhesive is exposed to light, curing starts and then stops as soon as the light goes off. Keeping the light on throughout the delivery of the correct dose lessens the chance of the bond being affected, as it often is when multiple exposures are used.


Exposure can also be affected at the bondline if neither substrate is able to transmit the necessary amount of light to the adhesive.

 


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A Sticky Problem: How to Dissolve and Remove Adhesive Residue Left Behind After Use

Posted By ASC, Thursday, June 25, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Trying to remove residue left behind by non-curing industrial adhesives used for tapes, stickers and labels, can be time-consuming, messy, frustrating, and ultimately ineffective. So can cleaning substrates to enable the application of new sets of similar items, when doing so involves using chlorinated or petroleum-based solvents.


In order to simplify the process, 3M has produced a citrus-based adhesive remover which is available in aerosol cans, spray cylinders, or in bulk containers. According to the company, application of the adhesive remover involves spraying a coating on the surface or parts which are covered with adhesive residue, leaving it for a few minutes to loosen and dissolve the residue, and then wiping the area clean. The adhesive remover can be used in a similar way to clean substrates prior to bonding.

 

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Biocompatible Adhesive’s High Tg Allows Enables High Heat Input

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, June 23, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Adhesives supplier Panacol-Elosol GmbH has launched a new adhesive aimed at certain areas of medical device assembly, and particularly at applications with high heat input.

The company reports that contributing to the suitability of the one-component epoxy-based Vitralit 1605 for medical technology bonding, and to its versatility in high heat input applications, are its high Tg (glass transition temperature) of 150՞C, high chemical resistance and low shrinkage when fully cured, and a low thermal expansion coefficient.


According to the company, these factors help provide the high levels of stability required when bonding components at high operating temperatures. Combined with its ability to withstand sterilization, and form strong bonds with both glass and metal substrates, this made the adhesive especially suitable for medical device assembly such as bonding lens stacks or for fixing glass and rod lenses in endoscopes.

 

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A Pressure Sensitive Adhesive for High Temperature Hook and Loop Tape Fasteners

Posted By ASC, Thursday, June 18, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Once known mainly for replacing buckles as quick and easy ways to fasten sports footwear and hikers’ backpacks, hook and loop tape systems have risen to far higher levels over the years. They’ve found their place in the aeronautics, automotive and other industries, taking over the roles of a number of other mechanical fasteners like zippers, snaps, hooks and screws, and they have also swapped from using stitches, to utilizing adhesives for attachment to multiple substrates.


Other developments have given rise to specialist hook and loop tapes, such as 3M’s woven nylon high temperature hook fastener designed for signage and display, medical brace closures and for fitting seat backs and cushions in the aerospace and specialty vehicle assemblies. The company reports that this adhesive-backed hook and loop tape duo can withstand temperatures of up to 185°F, is suitable for indoor and outdoor use, and can be separated and effectively refastened up to 5,000 times without the fastening strength being compromised.


According to the company, a general purpose acrylic-based pressure sensitive adhesive was chosen to back the high temperature tape because of the adhesive’s moisture and heat resistance, shear strength and UV stability and for its ability to bond well with both low energy substrates like polystyrene, polycarbonate, acrylic and nylon, as well as those with high to medium surface energy such as clean, dry metals.

 

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Ensuring Optimal Adhesive UV Curing: Picking the Right Lamp is Key

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Two lamps that are primarily used in UV curing take different approaches and use opposing technologies. While one, the newer narrow spectrum LED Lamp, may seem to have benefits over the veteran broad spectrum Mercury Arc Lamp in areas like energy consumption and costs, operational speed and degradation of intensity, choosing which to use is not just about looking at the benefits and deciding to opt for the new or go with the old. The choice has to be based on what best matches the adhesive being used.


Simply swapping lamps could result in poor bonds or, at best, less than optimal ones. For a strong and durable bond there must be a perfect match between it and the spectral output of the curing lamp, as well as the dose it delivers based on a combination of light intensity provided and length of exposure.


The Mercury Arc Lamp has a bulb with an operational life of 2,000 hours and a tendency to lose light intensity over time. It also has a five minute warm-up time and a high operating temperature which means it consumes more energy, and there’s also the problem of strict regulations regarding the use of mercury. But while all these attributes which may seem to be negatives, it’s not as simple as all that.


Many adhesives require the broad spectrum light of the Mercury Arc Lamp to cure effectively and won’t produce an optimal bond when put under LED light. This is what makes the Mercury lamp, after decades of being the only UV lamp used for curing, still the most predominant type used.
This is in spite of the fact that the newer LED Lamp has an operational life of 20,000 hours, does not have a bulb, and has no degradation of light intensity. Its cooler light leads to a low operating temperature with no warm up time required, and the energy consumption is therefore much lower, so increasing its electrical efficiency and reducing its operating costs.

 


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The Benefits of Preparing Surfaces with Plasma for Adhesive Bonding

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Updated: Monday, June 15, 2020

When it comes to bonding and laminating, the surface tension and wettability play a big role in the process and its effectiveness, particularly when substrates are hard to bond because of low surface energy, which is the case with plastics like polypropylene, polyethylene and other polyolefins. Materials that are difficult to move or those that are lightweight but very large, such as CFRP structures in the aviation and automotive industries, can also cause problems.


This is where plasma technology steps in to assist. It will clear the surfaces of fine impurities and chemically modify the materials in order to optimize them for adhesive bonding and laminating. To achieve this, an atmospheric pressure plasma device powered by an integrated air compressor is used.


The treatment opens the way to including materials with plasma-improved mechanical properties as inserts in the laminates, and to processing bonds that were unprocessable before because of their low surface energy.

 

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Adhesives.org BLOG: Seeing is Believing – Qualitative vs. Quantitative Measurements

Posted By ASC, Monday, June 15, 2020

BLOG:  Seeing is Believing – Qualitative vs. Quantitative Measurements
 
By David Speth (adhesives.org blogger from Evans Adhesive)

One of the things I have noticed recently is an increased reliance on quantitative measurements. Advances in testing equipment have certainly made our results more accurate, reliable and reproducible. Automated screening tools allow us to evaluate hundreds of formulations to find unexpected islands of performance (ASC Formulations Short Course 2019: "High Throughput Design" by Dr. Kshitish A. Patankar Research Scientist Dow Chemical).

I wonder, however, if we are losing our grasp of the importance of the qualitative part of the data. This may be especially true now that many are working remotely and relying on others to report the data to them for analysis. For me, it is important to have eyes on the samples as they are prepared and tested and then again after failure to see what story they tell beyond the numbers.

The most important qualitative factor is the locus of failure. Whether a formulation gives adhesive failure at the substrate surface or cohesive failure within the adhesive layer is a critical factor in developing a successful product. While it is common to note the failure locus when testing pressure sensitive adhesives, it is not always true for structural adhesives where there can be multiple difficult to discern failure modes (adhesive, cohesive, near surface, primer layer or substrate). A colleague once said that getting the right strength when bonding plastic or steel was easy, but getting the failure mode the customer wanted (usually cohesive) was difficult. If the failure mode isn’t noted, it’s impossible. As an example, I recall watching a technician test a series of bonded plastic specimens. Failure started when the plastic yielded outside the bond line and ended when the yielded volume crept under the adhesive bond so all the numbers were the same. In this case the numbers did not tell a clear story.

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