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Aerosol Foam Sealants Standard Proposed by ASTM

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, June 8, 2016

ASTM’s Committee C24 on Building Seals and Sealants is currently developing a guide that will be used internationally in order to assist designers and consumers in choosing the most suitable aerosol foam sealants for projects. The standard would distinguish between sealants based on the areas in which they would be used, namely: windows, doors and skylights, where they would be applied as a secondary seal, fire blocking and gap sealing, and adhesive foams used as drywall or subfloor adhesives and for structurally insulated panels and insulated concrete forms.


The organization says that its new standard would help designers and consumers to understand the wide variety of foam sealants currently available on the market allowing them to make better material choices. The guide will also highlight the energy cost savings that can be achieved through the use of aerosol foams. An easily understandable format using pictograms will demonstrate the ways in which foam sealants can be used. Different types of dispensing mechanisms, and typical can sizes will be explained. The subcommittee is inviting expert input related to foam sealants’ movement capability and its measurement.


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New Liquid Gel Adhesive Cures Instantly on Exposure to Electric Current

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have announced the development of a new, low viscosity liquid gel adhesive. The adhesive can be applied with precision, and curing is activated by exposure to electric current. By varying the voltage and duration of the current, the adhesive is exposed to, adhesion can be fine-tuned.


The new adhesive can be used in medical device manufacture as well as in automobile and consumer goods production. There are also biological devices for which adhesives that are cured using heat or light are unsuitable or difficult to use. These include bioelectronics and polymer electronic devices that are attached to living tissue.


The bonds formed using the new adhesive are strong, and demonstrate high sheer strength while providing a high degree of elasticity. The tunability of the adhesive will allow it to handle specific vibration frequencies and create bonds that match the flexibility and firmness of living tissues.


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Arkema’s Bostik Expands its Capacity in Malaysia

Posted By ASC, Monday, June 6, 2016

Bostik, a subsidiary of Arkema, has expanded its capacity for manufacturing cementitious products in Malaysia. Its extended plant, situated in Seremban, uses Bostik’s polymer modified binder (PMB) technology to manufacture specialist adhesives for the construction industry, and the expansion was required owing to increased demand for Bostik’s adhesives by the Malaysian construction industry.


The products manufactured in the expanded facility include tile grouts, tile adhesives, floor levelling compounds and wall finishing coatings. The expansion follows in the wake of the opening of Bostik’s Johor Baru manufacturing plant in Malaysia two years ago. This facility serves the Singaporean and Southern Malaysian markets while the Seremban plant will supply the Central Malaysian, Northern Malaysian and Sabar regions.


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Adhesive ‘Fly Paper’ Automobile Coating the Next Trend in Pedestrian Safety?

Posted By ASC, Friday, June 3, 2016

When pedestrians are hit by a car, it’s not only the initial impact that causes injury. Quite often, it’s the way they’re sent flying, possibly impacting another object before being flung to the ground. Google thinks it may have the solution. Although its self-driving car aims to be perfectly responsive to road conditions, accidents can and do happen, as self-driving car tests have shown. What if a Google driverless car were to hit a pedestrian?


To deal with this question, Google has patented a sticky adhesive car coating that will keep the pedestrian attached to the car until it comes to a halt. The coating could be used on the front bumper, hood and side panels of its driverless cars and may save pedestrians from injury after an impact. Anyone who has seen how insects and dirt end up stuck to surfaces without the help of adhesives might well wonder if dust, flies and midges wouldn’t be way more likely to end up stuck to the coating, but Google’s patent has the answer to that too.




The adhesive coating would be covered with a fragile, eggshell-like coating that would break on impact, exposing the adhesive, but the coating wouldn’t break when dirt and insects make contact. Although there may be other problems, such as the victim obscuring the driver’s view of the road, Google has been praised for its safety initiative, since most manufacturers only consider driver and passenger safety in the event of accidents.


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GM Gives Repairers a Crash Course in Impact Resistant Adhesives

Posted By ASC, Thursday, June 2, 2016

With vehicle manufacturers relying all the more heavily on adhesives in vehicle assembly, repairers also need to get up to date on the latest adhesives as well as when and where to use them. General Motors says that adhesives are ‘central’ to vehicle manufacture and repair since 2015, and is providing training and advice to repairers.

 

It stresses the importance of contacting OEMs to find out about the right adhesives to use when performing structural repairs, since the stiffer chassis made with the help of adhesives improves the ride experience and reduces noise. Specialized adhesives can’t be replaced with any old ‘glue’ or standard body filler, and applying welds to materials such as ultra-high strength steel compromises the strength of the material. To repair a car so that it’s literally ‘as good as new’ repairers need to be informed about the right adhesives to use.

 

3M suggests that giving repairers the cue to find out about the correct adhesives could be as simple as color coding the adhesives used during auto manufacture. For example, if an adhesive appears silver during application, that’s relatively standard, but if the adhesive cures to a purple or red color, repairers will know that they’re looking at a specialized adhesive. That’s how 3M is making its 7333 adhesive distinctive.

 

Other impact-resistant adhesives that repairers will need to look out for include Ashland Pliogrip 5770 and LORD Fusor 2098. When repairing a car, no substitutions can be made. If this happens, safety as well as drive experience may be negatively affected. And although these adhesives have seen the widest useso far since 2015, they’re still present in older cars. A 2012, 2013 or 2014 model, for example, could also require a knowledge of adhesives for a safe and effective repair.

 

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New Advance in Medical Adhesives Allows Repositioning and Pain-free Removal of Products

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Lohmann Corporation has announced its release of a new range of adhesives developed for the manufacturers of wound care products. The new adhesives, the DuploMED Soft-Stick™ Series allows wound care products such as dressings to be securely applied, but also allows for repositioning and pain-free removal.


The gel like PSAs used in the adhesives aregamma-sterilization stable and won’t damage fragile skin when dressings are removed and changed. In addition, the adhesives ensure that wound dressings can be contoured and sealed without trapping water vapor inside. Although the functionality of the adhesive is very similar to that of silicone medical adhesives, the new formula is a great deal more cost-effective.

 

In trials, manufacturers remarked on the cost savings they were able to achieve, while caregivers said they were pleased with the adhesive’s performance, comfort, and the pain free dressing removal it offers.


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Henkel Targets Automotive Interiors with a New Range of Adhesives

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Consumers expect automotive interiors to be attractive and comfortable while automotive manufacturers strive for lightweighting. Henkel unites these two sets of interests with its range of three new adhesives designed for automotive interior use.

 

A one-part, water-based laminating adhesive, AQUENCE ® PL 5101™ eliminates the need for two part adhesives in lamination. Its longer bonding open time reduces labor needs and allows for easier clean up, and the adhesive can be sprayed, brushed or rolled on with ease.

 

TECHNOMELT® AS 8383™, on the other hand, is a hot melt adhesive that bonds a variety of substrates including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polypropylene. The adhesive has high heat resistance, making it suitable for use in installing carpeting, flooring and headliners.

 

TECHNOMELT® XPO 1051™ is a reactive polyolefin hot melt adhesive able to produce effective bonds across a wide variety of materials. It allows for the elimination of pretreatment processes when bonding low surface energy substrates.

 

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BLOG: A New Aspect of EPDs and Specifications

Posted By ASC, Thursday, May 26, 2016

LATEST BLOG from ADHESIVES.ORG

 

Contributed by Paul Bertram

  

I just returned from a Bi-Region CSI conference where I sat in on a presentation about EPDs and their relevance to specifications. While this was a familiar topic for me, I always appreciate different perspectives. For the most part the presenter was accurate, however, I did challenge information regarding LCA data output(reporting) based on differences in LCA software data bases such as GaBi and SimaPro. The point being that Product Specific (or Industry Wide) EPDs aren’t intended for direct comparison even when conducted under the same product category rules. How an end point environmental impact is reported could vary because of the differences in data bases, unit measurement, or variances in processes. These differences would be considered “noise” (accepted variance) within the reporting.

 

It also has to be understood that for product (or assembly/system) comparative analysis, evaluation requires normalization and weighting of the data to be valid. An example would be comparing an Insulated Metal Panel system including required sealants compared to Tilt up Concrete, Pre-Cast Concrete or steel frame construction with insulation, air barrier, and coatings. You can’t lay out EPDs of these differing systems and make an evaluation that is accurate.

 

READ MORE

 

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Wood and Glue Skyscrapers to Replace Concrete and Steel Construction?

Posted By ASC, Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Super-powerful adhesives are being used to create laminated wood that is as strong as concrete reinforced with steel, and building skyscrapers from the new wood laminates isn’t just a theory, it’s a practical reality that points towards a new direction in architecture.


Cross laminated timber is made from smaller planks that are bonded with polyurethane adhesive, and architects and environmentalists are excited by the prospect of building wooden skyscrapers. The plans for the first of these, a 174ft building commissioned by the University of British Columbia as a student residence, were already approved in 2015.


The revolutionary new concept offers a number of benefits. Wooden skyscrapers will be more aesthetically pleasing, construction sites will produce less waste and noise pollution, and the buildings will be completed more quickly. In addition, the emissions generated in concrete and steel manufacture will be eliminated while the wooden construction material itself represents carbon sequestration from the atmosphere.


Architect Michael Green says that constructing a 20 story concrete and steel building would cause 1,200 tons of CO2 emissions, while a wooden building of the same size would represent CO2 sequestration of 3,100 tons – the equivalent of removing 900 cars from the road for a full year.


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Active Minerals International (AMI) Expanding Capacity

Posted By ASC, Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Process improvements aimed at expanding capacity are being undertaken by Active Minerals International (AMI), the world’s largest manufacturer of gellantattapulgite used in the manufacture of sealants, adhesives and coatings. Changes to be made include alterations to process flows, the introduction of advanced manufacturing data software and equipment, and increased automation of processes.


Capacity is being expanded as a result of increased demand in the international coatings market served by AMI. The upgraded equipment will result in a higher volume of paint grade products being made available, meeting market growth resulting from the construction boom in developing markets.


AMI’s Director of Global Business Development says that Min-U-Gel® attapulgite production enjoys priority, and attributes international demand to the purity of its gelling clay. This results in product performance benefits such as improved flow and leveling, control over syneresis, no fade under repeated or prolonged shear and a reduction in floating and flooding of organic pigments.


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